YMCA of Central Ohio Community

2016 Annual Impact Report

COMMUNITY FIRST

It gives us great pleasure to present the 2016 YMCA of Central Ohio Annual Report, commUNITY. With over 160 years of service to the local community, we know and appreciate the thousands of members, volunteers, staff and community partners who unite with us each and every day to strengthen our community through Youth Development, Healthy Living and Social Responsibility.

This year’s report spotlights our commUNITY impact. Everyone deserves a Y experience. As we set out at the beginning of 2016, we wanted to make a tangible contribution to communities throughout Central Ohio. While we’ve presented just a few examples behind the statistics, the YMCA of Central Ohio was able to deliver $16M in community impact. Without the tremendous generosity of our staff, board, volunteers, community partners, and donors, this would not have been possible.

A few of our 2016 highlights include:

  • Y Without Walls, a program that focuses on uplifting the underserved Linden community
  • Providing Central Ohio's most vulnerable women, men and children with essential supportive services for a better future through the Van Buren Center
  • Growing and expanding our chronic disease prevention programs to meet the escalating health needs in our community
  • Joining forces with the Don M. and Margaret Hilliker YMCA, creating new opportunities for collaboration with YMCA Camp Willson and expanded the Y’s ability to serve the Bellefontaine area
  • Partnering with KIPP (Knowledge Is Power Program) to give underserved children access to a premier early childhood education
  • Working to ensure that the Y is a safe and welcoming place for all members of our community through intentional diversity and inclusion initiatives

We offer a heartfelt thanks to all of you who help make our commitment to a stronger Central Ohio a reality. The possibilities that exist for our organization inspire us, and we are humbled by our responsibility to feed the hungry, house the homeless, promote a healthy lifestyle, and nurture the potential of every child in our community.

We look forward to the opportunities that 2017 will bring to hear your stories, and new ways to serve our community, and together, build a better us.

In Service,


Diversity & Inclusion

The Y is committed to creating a safe place for all people to express who they are. We are made up of people of all ages and from every walk of life working side by side to strengthen communities. Together we work to ensure everyone — regardless of gender, income, faith, sexual orientation or cultural background — has the opportunity to live life to its fullest. We share the values of caring, honesty, respect and responsibility—everything we do stems from it.

Youth Development
Youth Development: All children are of promise.
At the Y, we nurture the potential of every child
so they can learn, grow and thrive.

COMMUNITY IN THE FUTURE

This Y Without Walls works alongside those at Linden McKinley STEM Academy to provide more mentors and positive activities outside of school in the evenings and on weekends.

Since June of 2016, the YMCA of Central Ohio has been working to build a brighter future in the Linden neighborhood of Columbus, an underserved community that struggles with issues such as vacancy, litter, violence, crime, and high infant mortality and teen pregnancy rates. This new initiative, made possible through a grant from Battelle, aims to give kids safe places with adults who are invested in their future.

A central component of the Y’s work in Linden is making connections and building partnerships with other organizations to better tackle specific issues in the community. One of our partner organizations, Celebrate One, created an app called Celebrate Linden. This resource improves access to services and uses incentives, like Y memberships to keep young people committed to their education, to stay in school and engage in healthy activities.

The Y has a presence in Linden each day, including weekends, giving kids positive things to do outside of school that help meet social and emotional needs. Mentors at Linden McKinley High School work to help kids be positive, work towards graduation, and set achievable goals for themselves.

When kids have people with high expectations who hold them accountable, it helps mitigate problems that develop as a result of childhood trauma, such as the later development of heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

"It takes removing titles, being vulnerable, being present, and it takes authenticity,” explains Malik Moore, who is leading the YMCA of Central Ohio’s presence in Linden. “Through time, people will see the authenticity of the Y’s mission. They will trust that the people serving their community will do what they say they’re going to do."

Stats

Early Childhood Education

The YMCA of Central Ohio is supporting the academic achievement of more than 4,600 children annually at 94 centers throughout Central Ohio, making us the largest provider of childcare and early learning programs in the area.

In 2016, the YMCA of Central Ohio teamed up with KIPP (Knowledge is Power Program) Columbus to expand those numbers by opening our largest early learning program to date: the KIPP/YMCA Early Learning Center. KIPP is a national network of free, open-enrollment college preparatory public schools.

“We are in a unique position to provide an enriching environment and high-quality pre-K opportunities for our community,” says KIPP Columbus Executive Director, Hannah Powell. “To be able to partner with an organization like the YMCA, which shares similar missions and goals, will be incredibly transformational.”

At the Y, partnerships with like-minded organizations are an integral part of our critical and growing emphasis on childhood development and educational achievement.

“We’re excited to have a partner like KIPP, where we can help with the seamless transition from preschool to elementary school,” says Vice President of Youth Development, Becky Ciminillo. The YMCA of Central Ohio believes that investing in our youth allows us to create lasting personal and social change—not only for the children we serve, but for our community as a whole.

Boy with Ballons

NURTURING THE POTENTIAL OF KIDS

Before and After School Care- Y-Club

With so many demands on today's families, parents need all the help they can get. That need is what has driven the YMCA to become America's largest child care provider. Through our affordable child care programs, we create a safe, nurturing environment for children to learn, grow and develop social skills.

The YMCA of Central Ohio operates more than 50 before and after school sites. We’ve designed the curriculum for Y-Club around these eight core services:

  • Arts & Humanities
  • Character Development
  • Health
  • Wellness & Fitness
  • Homework Support
  • Literacy
  • Science & Technology
  • Service Learning & Social Competence
  • Conflict Resolution

Our Y-Club participants learn the importance of performing community service projects, and staff incorporate character development into daily lesson plans by emphasizing the Y’s four core values of Caring, Honesty, Respect and Responsibility.

87% agree that the program provides positive adult role models for their child.

94% agree that the program provides a safe secure environment for their child.

93% agree that the program helps make new friends, gain new knowledge and learn new skills.

81% agree that the program helps their child complete his/her homework.

97% agree that the program helps their child become more physically active.

81% agree that the program provides healthy snacks.

Child Care

ENSURING A BRIGHTER FUTURE

PALS

They are not at-risk. We believe every child is of promise.

The purpose of the Positive Alternative Learning System (PALS) program is to empower youth to make positive changes in their attitude and outlook for the future. Staff at the Y challenge youth to take responsibility for their actions, exhibit discipline and work hard in making smart choices.

Students who are on three, five, and ten day suspensions are referred to PALS by local public school systems, juvenile courts, departments of human services, and parents. While in the program, students participate in educational programming and behavior modification sessions, which holds them accountable for their actions rather than treating their suspension as a vacation. The students are placed in a classroom with a state-certified teacher, case manager, and staff assistant. Social services is also available to make referrals to a mental health expert.

By maintaining their school work, youth who participate in PALS learn critical steps they can take to rebuild their lives one step at a time, feel more confident about themselves and realize their potential to become active citizens in their community.

Youth Receive:

  • Individual & group counseling
  • Daily access to academic curriculum and credit recovery
  • Positive and safe environments created through the PBIS (Positive Behavior Intervention System)

Since 2008, city data shows that city crime (in target community neighborhoods) during the school hours has decreased in the following categories:

  • Auto theft (by 53%)
  • Home burglary (by 27%)
  • Assault with weapons (by 17%)
Healthy Living
Healthy Living: At the YMCA, we promote
well-being and healthy decision-making through
programs that build a strong, mind, body and spirit.

COMMUNITY IN WELL-BEING

Chronic disease is a growing health crisis in the United States. As the leading nonprofit committed to health and wellness, the YMCA is here to help maintain and prevent chronic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, arthritis, Parkinson’s Disease, cancer, and more. Stats

LIVESTRONG® at the YMCA

Participants: 130

Gives cancer survivors the opportunity to come to the Y to heal. We believe in partnering with people experiencing cancer to create a safe, loving and caring environment. Cancer knows no boundaries, but we believe in the strength of community and that every survivor deserves unconditional support, a chance to belong, and an opportunity to feel “normal” as they regain their strength.
  • 12 week class at no cost to cancer survivor
  • Increase in strength
  • Improved exibility and range of motion
  • Sense of belonging
  • Supportive community
livestrong

YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program

Participants: 457

In 2016, the YMCA of Central Ohio was selected as only one of 17 YMCAs in the country to receive Medicare funding for “lifestyle change programs,” like the YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program. The year-long program focuses on teaching participants healthy habits in order to prevent or delay the onset of Type 2 Diabetes, along with improving their overall health and well-being.

  • Proven weight-loss
  • Increased nutrition awareness
  • Learned portion control
  • Increases physical activity

PREVENTION IS KEY to living a longer, healthier life and reducing the cost of healthcare.
Data shows the impact the YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program has had on seniors and those covered through the Centers for Medicare and the Medicaid Innovation Grant. For those who participated in the program there was a total health savings of $3,336 over a three year period. If we use that figure for those served in 2016, the total projected health savings was $1,524,552.

YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program

Healthy Weight & Your Child for youth and their families

Participants: 77

This program addresses childhood obesity. Through the year-long program, children and their caregivers focus on nutrition education and physical activity to encourage healthier eating habits and an active lifestyle.
  • Proven to reduce a child's body mass index and waist circumference
  • Increased nutrition awareness
  • Learned portion control
  • Increased physical activity
  • Improved self-esteem
80% of U.S. Children do not meet the minimum of recommended physical activity 60 minutes and day, 6 times a week (YMCA of the USA).
Healthy Weight & Your Child for youth and their families

Enhance®Fitness for active older adults

Participants: 630

An evidence-based group exercise program for older adults that uses simple, easy-to-learn movements to motivate individuals (particularly those with arthritis) to stay active.
  • Increased energy
  • Improved balance and exibility
  • Increased upper body and lower body strength
  • More feelings of happiness
  • Better sense of independence
Healthy Weight & Your Child for youth and their families

OhioHealth Delay The Disease for those struggling with Parkinson’s Disease

Participants: 47

In 2016, we proudly partnered with OhioHealth to bring Delay The Disease™ to the YMCA of Central Ohio. This nationally-recognized program helps those facing the struggles brought about through Parkinson’s Disease. Aiming to reduce the symptoms and help manage the disease, this program has been proven to help participants in so many ways.
  • Increased mobility and confidence
  • Get out of bed or rise from a chair independently
  • Improved handwriting
  • Ability to dress independently
Ohio Health Delay the Disease
Social Responsibility
Social Responsibility: We work to unite our community, to help those in need to reach their full potential, and to
create lasting positive social change.

COMMUNITY IN HELPING OTHERS

The YMCA’s history is rooted in providing safe, affordable housing for men, women and families in need. We serve some of the most vulnerable in our community by providing supportive services needed to live independently.

The Van Buren Center is managed by the YMCA to assure Central Ohio’s growing population of homeless men, women, and families have a warm, safe place to spend the night and a healthy meal to eat—all under one roof. Van Buren provides a Flexible capacity that helps to eliminate wait-lists for shelters and the need for additional “winter overflow” space.

In 2016, the YMCA took over operations of the family side of the shelter and is capable of serving up to 85 families on any given night.

The Center serves as a “front door” shelter for adults and families experiencing homelessness for the first time, as well as overflow capacity when all shelters are full. Individuals staying at Van Buren also have access to a federally-qualified, on-site health center that provides free medical services. We instill hope and provide support to our guests for their long-term success through empowerment, community engagement, and teamwork.

stats
Stats Homelessness

Let’s Move! Outside

The Department of the Interior is the lead agency for First Lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move! Outside initiative. The Department was joined by the YMCA of the USA and the National League of Cities (NLC) to coordinate efforts to bridge the growing disconnect between young people and the great outdoors by creating meaningful connections to nature through four pillars: play, learn, serve and work. Through this partnership, the YMCA and National League of Cities, with support from American Express, are advancing the Department of the Interior's goal of seeding and supporting efforts that bring the four pillars of play, learn, serve and work alive for millions of children, young adults and veterans in communities across the country.
Let’s Move! Outside

Membership

COMMUNITY IN MEMBERSHIP

Thursday Club at the Eldon and Elsie Ward Family YMCA

thursday

Mission: To serve the interests of the black community

“This group lends wisdom and caring to the community...the support is real. We glue each other together.”
- Lawrence Auls, Thursday Club Member

For more than 70 years, the Thursday Club has called the YMCA home for its weekly meetings. Starting at the former Spring Street YMCA in 1946, the club has served as a place for African American men and women to meet freely - without any judgement or outside influences. “This group gave black lives a voice when there was none,” said Mr. Boyken, longstanding member of the Thursday Club.

With a focus on mentorship, advocacy and open communication, the club works to bring cooperation and harmony within the African American community and the community as a whole. Each week, the men have ongoing discussions about black life in America, and how to understand the conditions and circumstances that have a positive or negative influence on the central Ohio community.

“We share thoughts, ideas. This is a group of great minds,” shared Boyken.

Dorothy and Harold Hewitt
Pickaway County Family YMCA

fac

Harold Hewitt’s journey with the YMCA began in 1960, when he started working as a youth coordinator.

“We would travel to and from different classrooms across Columbus,” said Harold. “We’d go from Grove City, to Hilliard, to Canal Winchester, and more, bringing the Y along with us. I was able to see the positive impact that the Y had on youth.”

The Pickaway County Family YMCA opened its doors in 1968 with huge support from the residents of Circleville, and Harold was named the first executive director of the new facility.

“It gave me the opportunity to make a difference. The Y has really responded to the needs of this community. The Y is diverse in the sense that it has the ability and flexibility to adjust to whatever challenges present themselves.”

After Harold served 15 years as executive director, he retired as a YMCA professional, but his passion for the Y has remained strong. He and his wife, Dorothy, are still active members of the YMCA and continue to give back to the Circleville community.

“We visit the Y three times a week and exercise. We will always love the Y!”

Financials

COMMUNITY IN STEWARDSHIP

Revenue

COMMUNITY IN STEWARDSHIP

Expenses

Community in Leadership

2016 Metropolitan General Board

CHAIR
Tom Katzenmeyer President,

GREATER COLUMBUS ARTS COUNCIL

FIRST VICE CHAIR
Jamie T. Richardson

Vice President,
Government and Shareholder Relations,
WHITE CASTLE MANAGEMENT COMPANY

SECOND VICE CHAIR
Pamela Biesecker, CPA, MST

Senior Vice President- Taxation,
NATIONWIDE INSURANCE

TREASURER
Sue Zazon

President - Central Ohio,
THE HUNTINGTON BANK

SECRETARY
Stephen Ives

President and Chief Executive Officer,
YMCA OF CENTRAL OHIO

IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR
Hal Keller

President,
OHIO CAPITAL CORPORATION FOR HOUSING

John Ammendola
President and Chief Executive Officer,
GRANGE INSURANCE

Mary E. Auch
Senior Vice President,
Corporate Banking,
PNC FINANCIAL SERVICE GROUP

Barbara Benham
Executive Vice President,
Chief Communications Officer,
HUNTINGTON BANCSHARES, INC.

Stephen S. Brooks
Central Ohio Market President,
FIRST FINANCIAL BANK

Roger D. Campbell
Senior Vice President,
Central Ohio District,
KEY BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION

Geoffrey S. Chatas
Senior Vice President for Business and Finance
and Chief Financial Officer,
THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY

Craig Cowman
Senior Vice President, Generics,
CARDINAL HEALTH

Corey V. Crognale
Partner,
ICE MILLER, LLP

J. Miles Gibson, Esq.
ISAAC, WILES, BURKHOLDER & TEETOR, LLC

Cheryl L. Grossman
Director of Engagement,
LIFECARE ALLIANCE

Msgr. Joseph M. Hendricks
Vicar General/Chancellor,
ST. BRIGID OF KILDARE

Charles D. Hillman
President and Chief Executive Officer,
COLUMBUS METROPOLITAN HOUSING AUTHORITY

Todd M. Kegler
Director,
KEALER, BROWN, HILL AND RITTER

Sheriff Russell Martin
DELAWARE COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Grace A. McDaniel, PhD
Assistant Professor,
OTTERBEIN COLLEGE

Marissa Michaels
System Vice President,
OHIO HEALTH EMPLOYER SERVICES

Richard J. Miller
President and Chief Operating Officer,
NATIONWIDE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

Patricia Nelson
Head Start Representative

Carol Hamilton O’Brien
Prosecuting Attorney,
DELAWARE COUNTY

Hon. Guy L. Reece, II
Presiding Judge,
FRANKLIN COUNTY COURT OF COMMON PLEAS

Patrick Sanderson
Community Volunteer

Mark S. Slayman
Division Manager,
Commercial Banking,
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK

John W. Tolbert, MA
Director of Community Services,
COLUMBUS NEIGHBORHOOD HEALTH CENTER

Stanley A. Uchida
Vice President,
PARK NATIONAL BANK

Robert J. “Skip” Weiler, Jr.
President,
THE ROBERT WEILER COMPANY

Tim Wheat
Housing Representative,
YMCA OF CENTRAL OHIO

Community in Leadership

Advisory Members

John E. Bickley
YMCA OF CENTRAL OHIO (Retired)

James E. Grote
Founder and Chairman, DONATOS PIZZA, INC.

John P. McConnell
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer,
WORTHINGTON INDUSTRIES, INC.

Robert H. McNaghten
NATIONWIDE INSURANCE (Retired)

Curtis J. Moody, FAIA
President and Chief Executive Officer,
MOODY/NOLAN LTD., INC.

Robert J. Weiler, Sr.
Chairman,
THE ROBERT WEILER COMPANY

Benjamin L. Zox, Esq.
SCHOTTENSTEIN, ZOX & DUNN (Retired)

Association Executive Officers

Stephen Ives
President and Chief Executive Officer

Tina Badurina
Senior Vice President,
Marketing and Communications

Becky Ciminillo
Vice President,
Youth Development

Sue Darby
Vice President,
Housing and Healthy Living

Linda Day-Mackessy
Senior Vice President,
Philanthropy and Youth Development

Kim Jordan
Senior Vice President,
Operations

Brian Kridler
Senior Vice President,
Strategic Advancement

Lori Leist
Senior Vice President,
Human Resources

Bradley McCain
Chief Financial Officer

Justin McKinniss
Vice President,
Corporate Relations

Todd Tuney
Senior Vice President,
Corporate Relations and Social Responsibility

Marcy Yanus
Vice President,
Operations

Rich Zingale
Vice President,
Facilities

Executive and Department Directors

Nancy Brody
Executive Director,
School Achievement

Alexandria Dawson
Center Director,
Hilltop Educare Center

Scott Debney
Executive Director,
Web and Tech Services

Christopher Haverlock
Executive Director,
Corporate Wellness

Don Heard
Executive Director,
Juvenile Justice

Art Helldoerfer
Senior Operations Director,
Housing

Elissa James
Executive Director,
Risk Management

Carla Kossoudji
Center Director,
YMCA Early Learning Center

Nathaniel Lewis
Center Director,
Future Scholars CPO

Tara Neiswonger
Controller

Bertha Obayuwana
Park Manager,
Hoover YMCA Park

Caroline Rankin
Executive Director,
Chronic Disease Prevention Programs

Jim Sexstone
District Executive Director,
YMCA Camp Willson and Hilliker YMCA

Bobbi Shannon
Executive Director,
Early Education

Pamela Slater
Executive Director,
Volunteer Engagement

Community in Leadership

Executive and Department Directors (Cont.)

Steven Skovensky
Senior Operations Director,
Van Buren Center

Lynee’ Steinhaus
Center Director,
KIPP Center

Samantha Stewart
Executive Director,
Early Childhood Resource Network+

Monica Turner
Director,
Metropolitan Training

Kat Welz
Director,
Head Start

Thelma Young
Director,
Grants Administration

Branch Directors and Board Chairs

DELAWARE COMMUNITY CENTER YMCA
Matt Bruns

District Executive Director
David Norris
Branch Consulting Board Chair

DOWNTOWN YMCA
Sue Darby

Executive Director
Beth Tsvetkoff
Branch Consulting Board Chair

ELDON & ELSIE WARD FAMILY YMCA
Al Obayuwana

District Executive Director
Dr. L. Shon Burch
Branch Consulting Board Chair

GAHANNA/JOHN E. BICKLEY YMCA
Shanna Nolan

Executive Director
Kathleen Meyer
Branch Consulting Board Chair

GROVE CITY YMCA and VAUGHN E. HAIRSTON YMCA
Marcy Yanus

Vice President, Operations
Megan Witteman
Branch Consulting Board Chair

HILLIARD/RAY PATCH FAMILY YMCA
Cory Hughes

Executive Director
Andy T. Warnock
Branch Consulting Board Chair

DON M. & MARGARET HILLIKER YMCA
Jim Sexstone

Executive Director
William “Bill” Boy
Branch Consulting Board Chair

HILLTOP YMCA
Theresa Whittington

Associate Executive Director
Vacant
Branch Consulting Board Chair

JERRY L. GARVER YMCA
Marci Hasty

District Executive Director
Jeannette Henson
Branch Consulting Board Chair

LIBERTY TOWNSHIP POWELL YMCA
Mandy Bealer

Associate Executive Director
Greg Georgic
Branch Consulting Board Chair

NORTH YMCA
Trevor Secord

Executive Director
Jim Durham
Branch Consulting Board Chair

PICKAWAY COUNTY FAMILY YMCA
Jeff Phillips

Executive Director
Teri Roese
Branch Consulting Board Chair